Rennies River Flood Mitigation - Portugal Cove Rd to Kings Bridge Rd (2022)

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NEW: Given consideration to the December 2020 What We Heard document, the current scope of proposed flood mitigation work is focused on the area from Portugal Cove Road to Kings Bridge Road. Another public meeting will be held prior to the submission of the Environmental Preview Report for this current scope of work. Check out the Key Dates for details.

The Rennies River Catchment Stormwater Management Plan (RRCSMP) was completed in 2014. On May 26, 2014, Council Directive CD# R2014-05-26/5 recommended implementation of the recommendations below to address flooding in the area.

While the report recommended that the weir at Long Pond be given priority and the two problem areas located downstream of Long Pond be given second priority, the City has been working through the provincial environmental approval process for the Long Pond Weir Project since that time and the process is still ongoing. It has been determined through floodplain modelling that completion of the work in the Priority 2 area can proceed before the proposed work at the outlet of Long Pond.

Feedback gathered through this project will be included in the City's submission to the Government of NL as a part of the Environmental Assessment process.

NEW: Given consideration to the December 2020 What We Heard document, the current scope of proposed flood mitigation work is focused on the area from Portugal Cove Road to Kings Bridge Road. Another public meeting will be held prior to the submission of the Environmental Preview Report for this current scope of work. Check out the Key Dates for details.

The Rennies River Catchment Stormwater Management Plan (RRCSMP) was completed in 2014. On May 26, 2014, Council Directive CD# R2014-05-26/5 recommended implementation of the recommendations below to address flooding in the area.

While the report recommended that the weir at Long Pond be given priority and the two problem areas located downstream of Long Pond be given second priority, the City has been working through the provincial environmental approval process for the Long Pond Weir Project since that time and the process is still ongoing. It has been determined through floodplain modelling that completion of the work in the Priority 2 area can proceed before the proposed work at the outlet of Long Pond.

Feedback gathered through this project will be included in the City's submission to the Government of NL as a part of the Environmental Assessment process.

CLOSED: This discussion has concluded.

Review the FAQs. Can't find what you are looking for? Post your question/comment here and someone will get back to you soon.

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    I asked: "Controlling the flow of Long Pond will sometimes raise its level, flooding lower-lying areas as explained in several maps. Some of the trees in those temporarily flooded areas may die, due to waterlogged soil (we see that at other places near Long Pond as it is). What is planned for those trees after they die? Will they be cut and removed? Or left to rot over 20 years or so?" Your answer was for the Winter Ave. area, which is well below Long Pond. The water-logging I am referring to is around Long Pond itself. Your maps show low-lying areas around Long Pond being flooded during high water events. The ground there will become water-logged, probably killing some trees over time. Thanks for your answer, but it didn't address my question.

    Paul Goldring asked 2 months ago

    Thanks for the follow up. With the flow control structure in place, the pond will retain water for a longer period of time (which can be measured in days). This very short-term flooding is not expected to negatively impact trees.

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    Controlling the flow of Long Pond will sometimes raise its level, flooding lower-lying areas as explained in several maps. Some of the trees in those temporarily flooded areas may die, due to waterlogged soil (we see that at other places near Long Pond as it is). What is planned for those trees after they die? Will they be cut and removed? Or left to rot over 20 years or so?

    Paul Goldring asked 2 months ago

    Thank you for your question. Water logging should not be an issue.  A local storm system is proposed behind the berm for properties along Winter Ave.  This will be discussed by the consultant at the Public Meeting on March 22. To register see the Key Dates on this page.

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    What is the estimated cost to construct the berm upstream from Portugal Cove Road to the bottom of the Larch Place Park steps?

    David Winter asked over 1 year ago

    The flood mitigation works behind Pringle Place must also include the work along Rennie's Mill Rd, as well as, on the upstream side of the bridge parapet at Portugal Cove Rd.   The estimate to complete the flood mitigation in this area (which includes costs for engineering, construction and HST) is $1.5M.

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    I would argue that no one puts more footsteps on the path from Carpasian to Kingsbridge over the last 25 years than I. Flooding spots that I have noticed are the boardwalk at the bottom of Fieldian Grounds and a property off Winter Avenue. In this area the footpath has been reconstructed and acts as a berm. I assume at some time during major storms the river crests over that berm. It cannot then get back into the river and stays in the yard until it seeps into the ground. That is the problem with berms. There was limited discussion last night regarding the Vaughn Place berm. I was not aware there is flooding in that area. I had always assumed they had water table issues. Vegetation in the river holds soil in place. Removing it may increase soil movement and related problems. Rennies River has been recorded as having the highest biomass of German brown trout in the world. There was also an effort to reintroduce salmon to the river. How will habitat be affected by your project. The weir project may have environmental concerns that affect all of these concerns. A weir is only as good as the people who design, build, maintain and operate it. I was a bit concerned last night that from the tone of the City, this project was going ahead as designed. I certainly hope not.

    Fred Hubley asked over 1 year ago

    Thank you for your question. During detailed design, special attention will be given to areas where water could become trapped; the design solution will ensure that excessive amounts of water does not build up in isolated areas during significant rainfall events.   The proposed berms will be constructed on existing trails; therefore, excavation of river banks will be limited. Any excavation that does occur will be reinstated. For areas where erosion protection is requires, there will be some excavation in the river; however, the erosion protection design will minimize the amount of required excavation.  Standard practices, including the use of silt fences, will be employed during construction to protect the Rennie’s River.

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    In many cities, they are taking rivers OUT of channels and re-naturalizing shorelines. Naturalized shorelines can do a good job of flood control if bioengineered properly. I feel like building berms and walls will destroy the riparian shoreline, be bad for biodiversity and not solve flooding problems. Berms and walls will likely exacerbate flooding in high rainfall events upstream of the new structures.

    Walker and biologist asked over 1 year ago

    Your comments are duly noted. Thank you for providing your feedback. 

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    Some of my concerns were addressed at your meeting. Put my hand up but did not get called. The resident of Pringle Place, Brian I believe, hit on a major issue I have. I walk that trail from Carpasian to Kingsbridge every day. Summer and winter. I can recall walking along the path adjacent to Pringle after Gabriel or maybe Igor. The water barely flowed under the Portugal Cove Road bridge. If I could walk on the path what good would a raised berm do? The water would be up against the bridge. Would the integrity of the bridge withstand that flow of water? What would happen to the bridge and the road? Where would that water go? What would it take with it? Has there been any storm studies undertaken for the river? Measurements should be taken during storms. River height, total rainfall in the area at the time, and water table levels adjacent to the river. Where does the water go? Have cameras in the area. I also agree with him. The river takes away surface runoff during a storm. Portugal Cove Road becomes a river. Your berm will prevent the river from doing that. Steps up to the berm? The water will go around your berm. What is the budget for this project? And the Pringle Place residents don't want this done? Why are you moving ahead with it? Wait for the weir. A waste of taxpayers money and ruining a beautiful trail.

    Fred Hubley asked over 1 year ago

    Concerns raised are duly noted.  Not sure why your raise hand did not work effectively in Teams. We can certainly test that out for a future session in advance.  The river system has been hydraulically modelled incorporating the proposed flood mitigation measures. The berms will be designed in consideration of water levels that would be experienced during a significant runoff event.  For the Portugal Cove Road bridge, it is proposed that the existing safety rail on the upstream side of the bridge be raised by approximately 0.2 m by constructing a concrete wall. The elevation of the top of this new wall will match the elevation of the berms on either side of the river at the bridge.   Project funding budget is noted in the FAQs.  

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    What's the opinion of the Grand Concourse Authority on your project?

    Fred Hubley asked over 1 year ago

    Council directed staff to engage with area residents prior to the environmental assessment submission to the province. Any other stakeholders, including the Grand Concourse, would get an opportunity to comment through the Province’s process.

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    I live across the river from Riverdale and the riverbank (city property) adjacent to my property has suffered significant erosion over the past number of years. The city remediated a portion of the riverbank in 2008 but the remainder continues erode. How will building berms on the Riverdale side of the river impact further erosion along the riverbank adjacent to my property? Is there a plan to remediate the riverbank opposite Riverdale? How and when will the riverbank be remediated? I do not want our mature trees to be removed to accomplish this.

    Riverleigh asked over 1 year ago

    As part of the current flood protection work, the City is planning to provide erosion protection for this section of river bank. It is likely that amour stone, similar to the stone currently in place along this river bank, will be placed along the unprotected section. The intention is not to remove mature trees.

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    Will there be an equal amount of property security as I have now with the existing 6 foot chain link fence when the berm is built, ie will there be a 6 foot chain link fence on the new raised trail bed between my property and the edge of the new raised trail bed? - posted on behalf of David Winter

    over 1 year ago

    At the rear of 3 Pringle Place there will be a concrete retaining wall structure along the trail alignment.   Canadian Building code requires a minimum 1,050mm high handrail / fence along the top of the retaining wall adjacent to the elevated walking trail.  The detailed design for the handrail / fence have not been started.   Homeowners will be consulted on their preference of the fence height adjacent to their property.   The concrete retaining wall design can accommodate a 1,800mm high fence at the top of the wall.   Adding a 1,800mm high fence to the top of this retaining wall will increase the overall structure height (retaining wall 1,350mm plus fence 1,800mm) to 3,150mm at the rear of 3 Pringle Place.

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    The proposed berm to be constructed from Portugal Cove Road to approximately the foot of the steps leading to Larch Place Park was to be built following the weir dam at Long Pond ( Phase 1 of the recommendations) .Has the City formally asked the resident property owners, whose properties are adjacent to the proposed berms , if they want the berms built , without Phase 1 (the weir dam) being constructed firstly?

    David Winter asked over 1 year ago

    As noted in the August 24, 2020 Decision Note, one of the concerns raised during the December 19, 2018, Committee of the Whole meeting was what would be the affect with proceeding with Phase 2A flood mitigation works prior to the completion of the Long Pond Weir Project.  (This issue was raised through Council via email from area residents.)   CBCL were subsequently hired to undertake additional storm water modelling to review the impact of the downstream phasing sequence in the absence of the Long Pond Weir being competed.   Completion of the Long Pond Weir alone will not offer flood protection to accommodate the 1:100 AEP Climate Change design storm. The recent modelling completed by CBCL, as the alternative project phasing sequence, allows for the Phase 2 works to be completed in advance of completion of the Long Pond Weir and provide the necessary 1:100 AEP Climate Change flood mitigation to properties at Pringle Place, Winter Ave, Vaughan Place, Kings Bridge Road and The Boulevard.

Page last updated: 18 Apr 2022, 03:30 PM