Resilient St. John's Climate Plan

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Climate change is the biggest challenge of our generation. It is a sustainability cornerstone issue that needs to be addressed to achieve sustainable development and ensure that our efforts for long-term recovery are not undermined by the risks that climate change presents. Share your vision for the Resilient St. John's of the future.

The Resilient St. John’s Climate Plan focuses on this sustainability issue by addressing energy and climate change impacts. The plan will identify a 30-year Climate Action Strategy to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases, while re-enforcing efforts to stabilize energy costs by supporting energy efficiency. It will also provide strategies to further prepare the City to address the challenges and opportunities presented by the impacts from climate change.

In 2021, be part of the conversation by:

  • Participate in the activity to help identify low-carbon actions that could be taken to help St. John's achieve net-zero emissions by 2050, and about what is important to you when considering climate action:
  • Also, use the hazard mapping tool to identify any hazards you may have experienced in the past.

Note: If you are interested in hosting a Climate Conversation workshop, the City is glad to support your efforts by sharing resources and information. Please contact us to get a copy of the City Do it Yourself (DIY) Climate Workshop tool and guide, which was developed to support community groups with information and proposed questions to host a discussion about climate change.


Climate change is the biggest challenge of our generation. It is a sustainability cornerstone issue that needs to be addressed to achieve sustainable development and ensure that our efforts for long-term recovery are not undermined by the risks that climate change presents. Share your vision for the Resilient St. John's of the future.

The Resilient St. John’s Climate Plan focuses on this sustainability issue by addressing energy and climate change impacts. The plan will identify a 30-year Climate Action Strategy to reduce the emission of greenhouse gases, while re-enforcing efforts to stabilize energy costs by supporting energy efficiency. It will also provide strategies to further prepare the City to address the challenges and opportunities presented by the impacts from climate change.

In 2021, be part of the conversation by:

  • Participate in the activity to help identify low-carbon actions that could be taken to help St. John's achieve net-zero emissions by 2050, and about what is important to you when considering climate action:
  • Also, use the hazard mapping tool to identify any hazards you may have experienced in the past.

Note: If you are interested in hosting a Climate Conversation workshop, the City is glad to support your efforts by sharing resources and information. Please contact us to get a copy of the City Do it Yourself (DIY) Climate Workshop tool and guide, which was developed to support community groups with information and proposed questions to host a discussion about climate change.


Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Email this link

Map Hazards You Have Seen/Experienced

about 1 year

Click on the map and place a pin (drag and drop) with your thoughts about hazards in specific locations of the city.

Climate change is the biggest challenge of our generation. It is a sustainability cornerstone issue that needs to be addressed to ensure that other sustainability development outcomes and our long-term recovery are not undermined by the risks that climate change presents. 

Use the mapping tool to share your experience with climate hazards and how you have seen changes happening in our community.

What hazards are most closely related to climate change?

  • Flooding
  • Forest Fires
  • Wind (changes in wind and/or wind damage)
  • Erosion (coastal and river bank erosion)
  • Storm Surge (flooding or other damage)
  • Invasive Species (new or changes to existing)
  • Ice (changes in coastal and pond ice quantity and/or quality)
  • Drought
  • Ecosystem Changes (other ecosystem changes)

Learn more about these Hazards and how they link to Climate Change Here.

Page last updated: 17 February 2021, 15:45